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How an Infrared Sauna Can Help You Adjust to the Time Change

How an Infrared Sauna Can Help You Adjust to the Time Change

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How an Infrared Sauna
Can Help You Adjust
to the Time Change

By: Your JNH Lifestylist

The clocks jump forward an hour this month and unfortunately, this also means you lose an hour of sleep. While daylight savings time offers you more sunshine in the evening, you may feel a little groggy those first few days. But did you know infrared sauna sessions can help you adjust to the time change, as well as help you sleep better? Let us explain!


Understanding Your Circadian Rhythm

Your circadian rhythm is your 24-hour natural sleep-wake cycle, and your hypothalamus controls this cycle [1]. Darkness and light provide different signals to your hypothalamus regarding how to regulate it. In darkness, sensory input from your eyes is sent to the hypothalamus, triggering the brain to release melatonin, which makes you feel sleepy. This is why most people (unless you are on grave shift) sleep at night and work during the day. Light has the opposite effect on the body. When you are exposed to light, your body stops the production of melatonin and becomes more alert, which is why many sleep experts recommend exposing yourself to light first thing in the morning. However, not all wavelengths are created equal.

Infrared Light And Your Sleep-Wake Cycle

Inevitably, light has an impact on your natural circadian rhythm. Infrared light, on the other hand, can actually help you sleep. A 2015 study examining 47 individuals with a traumatic brain injury offers a prime example of this. These individuals underwent 18 red and near infrared light sessions; researchers discovered that with the use of infrared light, these individuals had an average of 1 hour more of sleep per night [2]. From this, researchers inferred that red and near infrared wavelengths have the ability to stimulate and increase melatonin production. While it is important to note that red light and infrared light are not the same thing, they do sit right next to each other on the electromagnetic spectrum. The combination of the two may offer many benefits when it comes to improved sleep.

Infrared saunas and wavelengths also have an array of other benefits that can help you sleep better, including:

1. Decreased Pain

Various research shows how infrared saunas can help manage pain [3]. In particular, studies show improvements in pain and stiffness in individuals with arthritic conditions [4]. This benefit may be due to improved circulation caused by the heating of the body from infrared therapy, as well as increased mitochondrial function which may improve the body’s healing capacity [5]. With reduced pain, individuals may fall asleep faster and stay asleep. Incorporating an infrared sauna session before bed may help you adjust to the time change by allowing you to get back on your usual sleep cycle faster and easier.

2. Increased Relaxation And Decreased Stress

Research also indicates that infrared sauna therapy can help promote relaxation [6]. Scientists suggest this relaxation and decreased stress may be induced by the release of endorphins and opioid-like peptides called dynorphins. When you are less stressed and more relaxed, it is easier to keep your mind calm and fall sleep at a reasonable time.

3. Improved Overall Health And Well-Being

Benefits of infrared sauna therapy also include detoxification, improved metabolism and cardiovascular function, increased skin health and rejuvenation, and enhanced immune function [6]. When your body is in an overall better state of health, it has an improved ability to regulate itself, such as your sleep-wake cycle. All in all, an infrared sauna is an excellent addition to your regular self-care routine. It can help you maintain optimal health, as well as ensure you get a good nights.

Use Your Infrared Sauna For Improved Sleep

The time change during the month of March is a tough adjustment for some people. That extra hour of sleep you lose can be the difference between having a productive day at work to just calling off altogether. If you do not already own a person infrared sauna, consider adding one to your home today. As mentioned, infrared sauna sessions can greatly improve your quality of sleep and overall health. There are a myriad of studies out there where you can read the positive benefits scientists are constantly discovering about infrared therapy. Give us a call and speak to one of our infrared sauna specialists today! Our number is (800) 528-3110, or you can always use our websites chat function to speak to a real person.


Resources:

[1] Sleep Foundation. (2020). “What is Circadian Rhythm?” sleepfoundation.org, 2020, https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/what-circadian-rhythm.

[2] Naeser M. A., and Hamblin M. R. (2015). “Traumatic Brain Injury: A Major Medical Problem That Could Be Treated Using Transcranial, Red/Near-Infrared LED Photobiomodulation.” ncbi.nlm.nih.gov, Photomedicine and laser surgery, 1 September 2015, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4560854/.

[3] Hussain J., & Cohen M. (2018). “Clinical Effects of Regular Dry Sauna Bathing: A Systematic Review.” ncbi.nlm.nih.gov, Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine, 24 April 2018, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5941775/.

[4] Floors M, Joel GJ, et al. (2009). “Infrared sauna in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. A pilot study showing good tolerance, short-term improvement of pain and stiffness, and a trend towards long-term beneficial effects.” ncbi.nlm.nih.gov, Clin Rheumatol, 7 August 2008, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18685882.

[5] Tsai, S. R., & Hamblin, M. R. (2017). “Biological effects and medical applications of infrared radiation.” ncbi.nlm.nih.gov, Journal of photochemistry and photobiology, 13 April 2017, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5505738/.

[6] Hussain J., & Cohen M. (2018). “Clinical Effects of Regular Dry Sauna Bathing: A Systematic Review.” ncbi.nlm.nih.gov, Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine, 24 April 2018, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5941775/.

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